by Sharon Sorour-Morris 28 Nov 2023
CCID Chairperson Rob Kane

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Cape Town Central City Improvement District (CCID) celebrates 23rd clean audit

Providing stability in challenging economic times has been key to the success of the Cape Town Central City Improvement District (CCID) – which celebrated its 23rd consecutive clean audit recently. 

Speaking at the AGM, CCID chairperson Rob Kane said that the organisation’s excellent performance in the first financial year since the end of the pandemic was due to its clear focus, consistency, hard work, and ability “to get the basics right”.

Strong corporate governance and financial control had resulted in the organisation’s 23rd clean consecutive audit, said Kane, who has chaired the board for 13 years.

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CCID Safety & Security
CCID Safety & Security members with Public Safety Officers in the Cape Town CBD.

CCID MANDATE

Kane, who heads up Boxwood Property Fund, said the CCID’s mandate was to provide top-up services within a 1.6 km² footprint in the Cape Town CBD in addition to those delivered by its primary partners – the City of Cape Town and SAPS – to ensure the city centre was safe and clean, and a welcoming environment conducive to business and property investment.

“The four pillars of our CCID mandate have remained unchanged over many years, namely Safety & Security, Urban Management, Social Development and Communication. However, the CCID has retained its relevance to its community by constantly evolving and adapting to circumstances on the ground,” said Kane.

The CCID had worked hard with its primary partners to stabilise the Cape Town Central City and transform it from the “crime-and-grime” scenario which existed 20 years ago to the CBD of today, where the total value of property has increased from R6 bn in 2006 to R42.9 billion in 2022.

CEO of the CCID, Tasso Evangelinos said the CBD had made an excellent recovery post-Covid. He praised the way retailers and business owners had weathered the Covid storm. 

Evangelinos said: “While the CCID proved its mettle in delivering a crucial and stabilising service during the pandemic, the CBD’s post-Covid recovery demanded even greater effort and agility to support a growing inner city.”

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Cape Town CBD
The CCID operates in the Cape Town CBD.

OPERATIONAL CHALLENGES

Evangelinos said the 2022/23 financial year was not without operational challenges on all fronts. CCID Safety & Security had to step its crime-prevention measures and strategically deploy its 317 Public Safety Officers to provide a visible safety presence 24/7 in an increasingly busy CBD.

Its Urban Management department had to deal with ever-increasing amounts of litter and illegal dumping in town, especially in pedestrianised areas, because of increased footfall. 

Similarly, the Social Development department, contending with more and more homeless clients in town, had had to meet the demands and challenges of finding shelter solutions, providing psychosocial support and realistic work-based rehabilitation opportunities and programmes.

“These three departments were ably supported by the Communications department, which promoted their work and achievements, securing media exposure worth more than R12 million and reaching a potential audience of nearly 500 million people,” Evangelinos said.

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CCID Board of directors
The CCID Board of Directors at its recent Annual General Meeting held in Cape Town.

CCID BOARD

Congratulating Evangelinos and the CCID team for delivering an impressive set of results in the reporting period, Kane also thanked members of the CCID board for their “time, expertise and guidance”.

“I would like to single out Nawal Ramasar, MD of Active Blue Valuation Solutions, on his 20 years’ service to the CCID, and David Stoll, regional head of Growthpoint Properties, on his 15 years’ service to the organisation. It is exceptional contributions like these from experts and key players in the Cape Town property and business environment that have guided the CCID on its path to success. I thank Nawal and David and wish David well in his retirement.”  

You can access the CCID 2022/23 Annual Report here.

CCID DEPARTMENTS: STATISICAL HIGHLIGHTS

The following are some of the statistics achieved during the 2022-2023 financial year, per department.

Safety & Security

253 Arrests made together with the CCID’s law enforcement agencies
6 630  Number of fines issues by City of Cape Town Law Enforcement Officers (LEOs) (funded by the CCID) to the value of R6.3 million
22 350 Safety interactions conducted
5 102 Number of stop-and-search operations done with Law Enforcement
45 073 Fines issued by City of Cape Town traffic wardens (funded by the CCID) totalling R11.7 million

Urban Management

1 254 Tonnes of litter and illegally dumped waste removed to landfill 
1 996 Graffiti tags removed
35 259 kg Debris removed from cleaning storm water drains 
10 504 Number of times municipal drains were cleaned
1 900 Kilograms of cigarette-butt litter removed from 307 CCID-branded
cigarette bins
370 Number of potholes repaired by the Road Maintenance team
12 608 Number of bags of organic waste (leaves) collected for composting

Social Development

121 Adults placed in shelters
269 Number of times CCID social & field workers interacted with new homeless clients
34 Number of times assisted with national family reunification
17 Number of homeless assisted with skills training and jobs referrals
11 000 Number of used needles collected in public spaces in association with TB HIV Care
639 Number of times homeless clients referred for assistance by peers on the department’s Peer Field Worker Project 
R41 938 Amount collected during the Hope for the Homeless campaign for NGO partners

Communications

346 Media clips generated across broadcast, print and online channels
R12 754 231 Value of total media exposure obtained during the year
495 365 978 Total estimated reach of readers/viewers in terms of the media clips generated
73 000 Copies of the CCID publications produced and distributed
138 285 Subscribers reached across the CCID’s various online platforms (three Facebook pages, Twitter, Instagram, YouTube, LinkedIn, the CCID website and via the monthly e-Newsletter)
253 000 Items distributed with regard to the CCID’s many targeted campaigns

IMAGES: Carmen Lorraine

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